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   WELCOME TO THE CHEVY VOLT PAGE

Why Enthusiasts Should Love the Chevy Volt

Makes More V-8s Possible
From the March, 2011 issue of Motor Trend
 / By Todd Lassa
 | 
If General Motors had sold 10,000 Chevrolet Volts last year, the car would have bumped the automaker's Corporate Average Fuel Economy number by 0.3 mpg. That's a serious increase for a company that sold more than 2.1 million cars and light trucks in 2010. Why should you care? Because a higher CAFE number means GM could keep more high-horsepower, low-mpg performance cars in the mix.

The 0.3-mpg boost is a back-of-the napkin estimate of the Volt's effect on GM's car CAFE number from an insider. Since its inception in calendar year 1980, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's CAFE estimates amount to a black art. It was never about selling X high-mileage cars to offset Y low-mileage trucks, and each manufacturer has its own goal based on the 2016 total-fleet mandate of 35.5 mpg.

The 2010 CAFE mandate was 27.5 mpg for cars (light trucks are counted separately, and the way to calculate those numbers is even more convoluted). As of this writing, GM's car CAFE for '10 was about 30.6 mpg, some 3 mpg above its requirement. If an automaker's CAFE falls below 27.5 mpg, the company is subject to NHTSA fines.
Which Chevy Volt EPA sticker number does GM use? None, actually. Volt's all-electric mpg equivalent is 93 mpg; its gas-only number is 37 mpg. The CAFE number applied for any given vehicle is considerably higher than the numbers that appear on the sticker, because those numbers have been adjusted downward several times to better reflect real-world fuel economy. So the number the Volt applies to GM's CAFE is roughly 10 percent better than the 93 mpg equivalent number. For the new, Environmental Protection Agency greenhouse gas (GHG) number, it's allowed about 100 grams per mile, roughly half-or twice as good-as the Chevy Cruze's GHG.
The Volt's EPA calculation comes from a formula that uses both its all-electric GHG number, zero, and its all-gas GHG, which is based on the 37-mpg number. Thanks to the complicated formulas, the Volt's all-gas GHG number is expressed as higher than 37 mpg.

Under NHTSA, the Chevrolet Cruze, for example, rates a 45-mpg contribution to GM's CAFE. The Chevy Silverado Hybrid, with its 20/23-mpg sticker, contributes a 28-mpg number to GM's truck CAFE.

Conclusion? By law, all automakers must squeeze better mpg out of their cars and light trucks between now and 2016. With the Chevy Volt alone potentially boosting GM's CAFE to about 30.9 mpg this year, the car will help the automaker's numbers more as production climbs. The Chevy Volt makes it easier for GM to continue offering a full range of models, including the V-8 Chevy Camaro and Cadillac CTS-V.



Chevrolet Volt - Motor Trend 2011 Car of the Year

Attached Image: monthly_11_2010/post-51-0-50402300-1289922433.jpg

DETROIT – Motor Trend magazine, one of the world's premier automotive authorities, today named the Chevrolet Volt the 2011 Motor Trend Car of the Year.

"We expected a science experiment, but this is a moon shot," Motor Trend editors wrote for the January 2011 issue. "The Volt delivers on the promise of the vehicle concept as originally outlined by GM, combining the smooth, silent, efficient, low-emissions capability of an electric motor with the range and flexibility of an internal combustion engine. It is a fully functional, no-compromise compact automobile that offers consumers real benefits in terms of lower running costs."

Many of those benefits are due to the Volt's groundbreaking propulsion system. As the world's first electric vehicle with extended range capability, the Chevrolet Volt has a total driving range of about 350 miles. For the first 25 to 50 miles, the Volt drives gas- and tailpipe-emissions-free using electricity stored in its 16-kWh lithium-ion battery. When the Volt's battery runs low, a gas powered engine/generator seamlessly operates to extend the driving range more than 300 miles on a full tank.

The Motor Trend Car of the Year award was presented to Tom Stephens, GM vice chairman for Global Product Operations, at the General Motors wind tunnel in Warren, Mich.

Aero dynamics engineers there helped develop an equally revolutionary design: With a drag coefficient of .28, the Volt is also the most aerodynamic sedan in Chevrolet's history. Lowering the drag coefficient increases the vehicle's efficiency, as less energy is used to overcome air pressure. As an example, aerodynamics contributes up to eight miles of electric range, and 40 miles of extended range.

"Chevrolet is truly honored to receive one of the world's most coveted automotive awards," said Stephens. "The Volt team has worked under extraordinary circumstances to produce this breakthrough vehicle."

The full report from Motor Trend appears in the January issue of the magazine (on newsstands in early-December) and online at www.motortrend.com.

General Motors last received the Motor Trend Car of the Year award in 2008, for the Cadillac CTS.

  THE REVOLUTION IS HERE AND NOW !

       Go take a drive in a Real Chevy VOLT right now with Popular Mechanics first test ride - (article excerpt below)


                                             ^ CLICK ABOVE FOR CHEVY VOLTAGE.COM
HERE IS THE PAGE WHERE YOU CAN GET ALL THE NEWS ON THE CHEVY VOLT, GM'S NEW ELECTRIC FUEL CELL AUTOMOBILE... JUST CLICK ON THE PICTURES HERE TO SEE CHEVROLET VOLTAGE.COM


      

^ CLICK ABOVE FOR THE CHEVROLET VOLT ELECTRIC CAR HOME PAGE
   < THE NEW 2010 CHEVROLET VOLT
THIS IS THE SINGLE MOST REVOLUTIONARY NEW AUTOMOBILE INTRODUCED BY GENERAL MOTORS...EVER. DESTINED TO CHANGE YOUR "IDEA" OF WHAT A TRUE "WORLD CAR" IS ALL ABOUT !!
ALREADY AN EXTREME THREAT TO JAPANESE AUTO COMPANIES, THE VOLT IS MAKING HISTORY AS THE LEADER OF A NEW WAVE FROM GM OF TRUE ELECTRIC FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES.


^ THE ELECTRIC FUEL CELL POWER OF THE VOLT WILL BE PUT INTO OTHER GM MODELS WITHIN THE NEXT FEW YEARS TOO,...
(go see the news report below ; Advantages of Electric Cars) AS THE VOLT HAS RECEIVED PRE-ORDERS TO NEW CAR BUYERS FOR DELIVERY OF OVER 50,000 CARS RIGHT NOW...UNPRECEDENTED.
              
     THE CHEVY VOLT IS CHANGING THE WORLD...TODAY.

 

2011 Chevrolet Volt Pre-Production Test Drive | Popular Mechanics

Popular Mechanics gets behind the wheel of the pre-production Chevy Volt and first experiences the car in pure-electric and sustained-charge modes.

This post is an excerpt of an article from Popular Mechanics. You can read the full post (with video) on their website. Written by Barry Winfield.

LOS ANGELES—We’ve been following the Chevy Volt as it has progressed through many milestones before it became a development mule based on the 2011 Chevy Cruze last May. That test drive was completed entirely in electric-only mode. Today, we had a chance to slide behind the wheel of a Volt that looks and feels much closer to production. We experienced the car in both pure-electric and sustained-charge modes, when the conventional gas engine powers an on-board alternator to supply the needs of the electric motor when the batteries reach an elected state of discharge.

The Volt is still about a year away from production, with an intended launch date of November 2010. But for chief engineer Andrew Farah, the process has been remarkably condensed.

The prototype Volt we drove in the parking lot of the Dodgers Stadium in downtown Los Angeles is what Farah calls a 65-percent write-off vehicle, meaning it’s about 65-percent of the way to full production standards. As such, it had a few technical bugs already identified and rectified for future cars. Still, this prototype is a fully representative vehicle in terms of structure and drivetrain.

Electric propulsion systems are well known for their smooth and quiet operation. So the unobtrusive cycling of a gasoline engine is considered a crucial aspect of this kind of hybrid system. Consumers simply won’t tolerate a system that doesn’t operate seamlessly. Here is how the Volt performed.

The Specs

The Volt uses a three-phase AC induction motor rated at 120 kilowatts, or 160-horsepower, powered by a six-foot long, 375-pound array of lithium-ion cells mounted low along the Volt’s floorpan. Though Farah wouldn’t say precisely how much the Volt weighs at this point (we suspect it will tip the scales at around 3500 pounds), he did mention that much work has been done to keep the center-of-gravity as low as possible, to help diminish a driver’s perception of mass. Of course weight mounted higher in the chassis would result in more noticeable roll.

The engine is a normally aspirated 1.4-liter inline four-cylinder unit from GM’s global Family Zero range, manufactured in Flint, Michigan, and it is hooked to a 53-kilowatt alternator to provide current for the Volt’s electric motor once the battery pack has discharged about half way. To prolong battery life the cells are never allowed to recharge higher than about 80-percent of maximum, and they are never permitted to discharge more than about 50-percent unless an emergency occurs, and “limp home mode” is triggered.

Careful cell management is key to efficient utilization, not to mention the safe operation of lithium-ion cells, some of which have been known to fail in spectacular pyrotechnic fashion unless stringent temperature controls are in place. The Volt has dedicated cooling and heating systems in place for the battery pack, along with elaborate cell-condition monitoring mechanisms for optimal efficiency.

The chassis is based on GM’s Delta architecture, similar to that underpinning the new Cruze model, which promises contemporary ride and handling performance.


Chevrolet Volt Gets 230 MPG

Chevy Volt 230 mpg image

When the Chevrolet Volt launches it will be capable of 230 miles per gallon according to General Motors. The results are based on an all-new test developed by the EPA for the fuel economy of ultra efficient plug-in electric vehicles.

The announcement of Chevrolet Volt’s expected EPA fuel rating comes amid sweeping changes at GM. The automaker made a series of announcements recently, including the addition of new small Cadillac models to be slotted below the CTS says Cadillac dealers in Philadelphia. Additionally, GM will also be diving into a promotion with eBay Motors to sell Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick, and GMC vehicles online.

As one Ohio Chevrolet dealer points out, coming up with a fuel mileage rating for an electric car is not an easy task. GM has been working closely with the Environmental Protection Agency for years to determine how to attribute values to such vehicles. That being said, the Chevy Volt is still a ways off from showrooms, and the EPA has yet to officially test the Volt to confirm its expected 230 mpg.

The Chevrolet Volt is capable of driving 40 miles without using any gasoline. According to a Chevy dealer specializing in used cars Cleveland, it is only when that distance is reached that the gas engine is activated to charge the onboard batteries. For those driving under 40 miles, gas mileage is essentially unlimited. It’s estimated that once the gasoline engine is engaged, the Volt could earn a 50 mpg mileage rating, but that figure will not be included in the overall rating since the car would have to already have covered the first 40 miles before gasoline was needed.

For more information, see the full press release from GM below. Continue reading ‘Chevrolet Volt Gets 230 MPG’

Chevy Volt Based 'Jolt' Transformer Autobot

 - First Official Photos

By mlhail · February 11, 2009 · 3 Comments · 209 Views
Along with the all-new Corvette Stingray Sideswipe character, visitors to Chevrolet's display at this year's Chicago Auto Show that opens its gates to the public on Friday, February 13, will also have the chance to see yet another new Chevy-based model that will star on Paramount's upcoming release, "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." Jolt is a new Autobot character that appears in the production form of the 2011 Volt extended-range electric vehicle.

Tranformers JOLT Autobot - Chevrolet VoltLeaving aside from the fact that in the movie Jolt will turn into a human-like robot, the only visible differences between the production Volt and the Chicago Show Transformers film model, seem to be limited to the silver-colored exterior mirrors and the trim surrounding the lower part of the windows.

"Chevrolet is thrilled to again be part of one of the most anticipated movies in years," said Ed Peper, GM North America vice president, Chevrolet. "'Transformers' gives us a great opportunity to connect with young people on their terms, with a dynamic, environmentally friendly image. The new characters represent the change going on in Chevy showrooms. From the exciting Camaro, the 21st century sports car, to the game-changing Volt, there's more than meets the eye at Chevrolet today.

Tranformers JOLT Autobot - Chevrolet Volt
Tranformers JOLT Autobot - Chevrolet Volt

 WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF THE VOLT, WE CAN ONLY IMAGINE WHAT "CUSTOM VERSIONS" OF THE VOLT COULD LOOK LIKE :


^ STINGRAYSSTUDIOS "LIBERTY" VOLT CONCEPT DESIGN.


^ MOPAR MAGNUM'S - "STREET VOLT" CUSTOM COUPE VERSION !!

YOU JUST HAVE TO WONDER WHAT CHEVY CAN DO WITH THE VOLT NEXT



Lutz: High-performance Chevy Volt SS a "possibility"

New postby ArtRiX on Tue Nov 10, 2009 2:08 pm

Electric cars are for those who would rather drive slow, boring commuters that don't consume fossil fuels and therefore don't spew pollutants from their tailpipes. Gas-powered cars – and especially those wearing time-honored badges like SS, R/T or GT – are for those who prefer fire-breathing, tire-screeching performance and care much more about nitrous oxide than nitrogen oxide. Right? Not so fast, says Bob Lutz.

When asked whether or not Chevy could shock the performance crowd with an SS version of the upcoming Volt, Lutz said, "I would not discount that possibility." That's as close as you're going to get to an admission of intent this early in the game. Lutz goes on to suggest that the Voltec powertrain will allow for plenty of on-demand power. "[I]f we want to sacrifice a little bit of fuel efficiency in the interest of performance and still get over 200 miles per gallon, we can do that any time."

Following the same logical train of thought, we could certainly see a V-Series of the Cadillac Converj. If you're interested in hearing the news straight from the horse's Lutz's mouth, click past the break for a video....

Source: Autoblog

The Advantages of Electric Cars

by Eric Mack and Michael Waterman Wednesday, February 24, 2010
Featured Article Image

No technology is perfect and critics of electric cars gleefully point out the disadvantages electric car drivers will likely encounter on the open road. The biggest knock is that an electric car’s range is more limited than a conventional gas-powered vehicle. That’s an undisputed fact. And many observers still question the life of the battery.

At this point, the electric car simply won’t work for all drivers. While we don’t expect to convert electric car critics into fans, we do believe that electric cars offer real, tangible advantages worth considering—particularly for urban drivers who drive less than 50 miles each day.

Here then is our list of electric car advantages. We’re also looking at the issue objectively and have explored the “Disadvantages of Electric Cars” as a counterpoint. And if you're brand new to the electric car scene, you'll want to read "Electric Cars: A Brief Overview."

1. No tailpipe emissions

No internal combustion means no exhaust. A car doesn't get much greener than that. Of course, the juice in the electrical outlets you plug your electric car into is most likely created, at least in part, by burning coal, which creates a whole lot of pollution. But in theory, as alternative power sources like wind, solar and even nuclear become more plentiful, the more green electric vehicles will become and the more realistic a “true” zero emissions vehicle will become.

 

2. No more refueling

Pull your electric vehicle into your garage or charging station-equipped parking spot, plug 'er in and walk away. No pumps, no cashiers, no mess. Return three to eight hours later to a fully charged vehicle, or wait as little as 15 minutes for an 80 percent charge using a “quick charger.”

By some estimates, a daily commuter can expect to see as little as a $13 increase in their monthly electric bill. Figured another way, driving an average sedan will cost up to four times as much in fuel costs as you'd pay for the electricity to charge a Tesla Roadster every night (read: 2010 Tesla Roadster Review).

An upgraded electrical grid and developing technologies like using new ultra-capacitors in place of conventional batteries could allow for a future generation of vehicles that can be fully re-charged in as little as 5 minutes. That’s the future calling; for now, we’ll settle for no longer adding gas to a vehicle.

3. Minimal maintenance

All those parts moving so quickly and operating at such high temperatures inside an internal combustion engine can require lots of attention, as the folks at your local lube shop are more than happy to remind you every three months. The only real moving part in the electric motor is the shaft, which rarely requires maintenance. Expect to rotate your tires and refill the windshield wiper fluid on your EV every five thousand miles and plan to rest easy at night.

As for the battery packs, Prius owners are reporting driving as much as 190,000 miles without needing a replacement. GM has projected battery life of their plug-in electric vehicles at “about 10 years or 100,000 miles.” (read: Electric Vehicles: GM Goes Electric).

The debate over expected and realistic battery life rages online, of course. But many observers expect new battery technology to give us packs that will outlast the life of the car relatively soon. If your battery should die, the good news is that replacement prices continue to come down. We’re hopeful that by the time you need to replace the battery pack in the current generation of vehicles, battery packs may actually be quite affordable.

4. A quiet and smooth ride

Without all the thousands of controlled explosions happening every minute in an internal combustion engine, an electric car provides a completely different kind of ride. A Tesla Roadster can reportedly hit 62 mph in about 4 seconds with less commotion than a gentle breeze (watch: 2010 Tesla Roadster Video Test Drive).

And you’ll drive electric cars without a gear box. Taking RPMs out of the equation means that a battery-powered car has a high torque over a larger range of speeds while accelerating, compared to an internal combustion engine.

In other words, despite what you may have heard, electric vehicles can be fast. Seriously fast. In fact, the world’s fastest electric-powered motorcycle from KillaCycle accelerates from 0 to 60 in less than one second. That’s not a typo.

5. Tax credits for a qualifying electric vehicle

Electric vehicles will typically cost more than comparable conventional vehicles. Just like hybrids before them, early adopters will pay a premium for electric technology.

But the government policymakers really want you to at least consider and possibly drive one. That's why automakers are making a concerted effort to develop affordable mass-market electric cars like the upcoming 2011 Nissan Leaf (read: Nissan Leaf Preview). Pricing for the Leaf is projected between $25,000 and $30,000.

Plus, the government is offering tax credits of up to $7,500. Add to that the $500 - $1,000 in annual operating cost savings from eliminating gasoline – Nissan sees a cost of about $13 to drive 620 miles in a Leaf, versus the $63 in gas it might cost to drive the same distance in say, an Altima – and suddenly you've got one of the most competitively-priced cars on the market over a decade of ownership.

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